I will put sugar in your marmalade
Part Nine of The Wizard’s Tale, in which the Wizard gives his instructions, and shit starts getting weird.Originally at Benchiladaland, with all of the previous chapters

Part Nine of The Wizard’s Tale, in which the Wizard gives his instructions, and shit starts getting weird.

Originally at Benchiladaland, with all of the previous chapters

How I feel about my new tattoo and the live-action series.

How I feel about my new tattoo and the live-action series.

101st-analborne:

rosalarian:

rosalarian:

My friend called me a fecal wizard as an insult the other day, but I thought it would be a really fantastic mutant power, and I haven’t been able to shut up about how cool it would be, and now he regrets ever saying the words “fecal wizard”, so I win.

image

That redacted panel is where you get to use your imagination about what happens. The black box is where all the fanfiction happens. (Oh, god, let there be fanfiction of this.)

People have been reblogging this again, and it remains one of my favorite comics I’ve ever done.

Someone MUST filk the Who song “Pinball Wizard” into “Fecal Wizard.”

Is mine the first Patlabor tattoo?I don’t know, but I fucking love it.Mad thanks to Matt Decker of Premium Tattoo for this pre-color linework.

Is mine the first Patlabor tattoo?

I don’t know, but I fucking love it.

Mad thanks to Matt Decker of Premium Tattoo for this pre-color linework.




doctorscienceknowsfandom:

Some call me … Tim.

OMG OKAY THIS IS GOLD. The pallas cat at my local zoo apparently does this, and there’s a little sort of kid-level viewing window into its habitat, and the keeper in that area told me that the pallas cat likes to hide beneath the window. So when the kids press their faces up to the glass, searching the exhibit for the animal, the pallas cat suddenly pops up directly in front of their faces and scares the ever-loving shit out of them. Pallas cat: recreationally scares children. Tell your friends.

doctorscienceknowsfandom:

Some call me … Tim.

OMG OKAY THIS IS GOLD. The pallas cat at my local zoo apparently does this, and there’s a little sort of kid-level viewing window into its habitat, and the keeper in that area told me that the pallas cat likes to hide beneath the window. So when the kids press their faces up to the glass, searching the exhibit for the animal, the pallas cat suddenly pops up directly in front of their faces and scares the ever-loving shit out of them. Pallas cat: recreationally scares children. Tell your friends.

bear1na:

Pippi Longstocking, The Strongest Girl in the World watercolour concept art by Hayao Miyazaki.

These watercolour concept art was pitched by Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata to Astrid Lindgren (Pippi Longstonking’s creator), but it never went ahead.

MY NEWEST ART! Parts 8 & 9 of The Wizard’s Tale.See the rest of the story along with the rest of the entry at Benchiladaland.

MY NEWEST ART! Parts 8 & 9 of The Wizard’s Tale.

See the rest of the story along with the rest of the entry at Benchiladaland.

zegas:

Walt Simonson
biggoonie:

Orion #21 by Walt Simonson

zegas:

Walt Simonson

biggoonie:

Orion #21 by Walt Simonson

medievalpoc:

1800s Week!
aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:Read the whole entry, dopey!
Georges Seurat
An Indian Man
Graphite.
France (c. 1878–79)
The J. Paul Getty Museum
[x]
The Getty Blog says:

Another question now demanded to be answered: where could Seurat have met such an unusual figure in 1878 Paris?
In 1878, the Universal Exposition was in full swing in Paris. Here people from all around the world gathered to display and see new technologies, arts, and sciences. Researching 19th-century world’s fairs, such as the 1878 Universal Exposition, took me down a dark road of colonial exploitation and imperial domination. It was quite common for colonial peoples, alongside goods and technologies, to be displayed in the pavilions. Some countries went as far as to create human zoos filled with “attractions” such as African Pygmies, Native Americans, and Indian yogis. In the 1878 Universal Exposition, Seurat’s brother-in-law (whose wife, Seurat’s sister, was once the owner of An Indian Man) had a booth dedicated to his glass-making business. Seurat could have encountered his model at the Exposition, given the high concentration of foreign peoples in Paris for the fair.

Interior of the Indian Palace on the Champ-de-Mars, Universal Exposition
Engraving after drawing by J. Mirma.
Original drawing: Groupe de recherche Achac, Paris.
France,  Paris (1889).
Given the demeaning treatment of non-Europeans at the Exposition, Seurat’s dignified depiction of an Indian man becomes even more extraordinary. The soft fall of light on the man’s chest, the delicate rendering of his beard and wrinkles, and the use of negative space create a calm, serene atmosphere that celebrates the sitter’s body rather than exoticizing it.
An Indian Man remains a mysterious drawing in Seurat’s body of work. We may never know the true origins and background of the man in the drawing, but it is this very mystery that makes An Indian Man such a mesmerizing object. Come see it for yourself through August 24, 2014, in the Getty Center’s West Pavilion.

medievalpoc:

1800s Week!

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Read the whole entry, dopey!

Georges Seurat

An Indian Man

Graphite.

France (c. 1878–79)

The J. Paul Getty Museum

[x]

The Getty Blog says:

Another question now demanded to be answered: where could Seurat have met such an unusual figure in 1878 Paris?

In 1878, the Universal Exposition was in full swing in Paris. Here people from all around the world gathered to display and see new technologies, arts, and sciences. Researching 19th-century world’s fairs, such as the 1878 Universal Exposition, took me down a dark road of colonial exploitation and imperial domination. It was quite common for colonial peoples, alongside goods and technologies, to be displayed in the pavilions. Some countries went as far as to create human zoos filled with “attractions” such as African Pygmies, Native Americans, and Indian yogis. In the 1878 Universal Exposition, Seurat’s brother-in-law (whose wife, Seurat’s sister, was once the owner of An Indian Man) had a booth dedicated to his glass-making business. Seurat could have encountered his model at the Exposition, given the high concentration of foreign peoples in Paris for the fair.

Interior of the Indian Palace on the Champ-de-Mars, Universal Exposition

Engraving after drawing by J. Mirma.

Original drawing: Groupe de recherche Achac, Paris.

France,  Paris (1889).

Given the demeaning treatment of non-Europeans at the Exposition, Seurat’s dignified depiction of an Indian man becomes even more extraordinary. The soft fall of light on the man’s chest, the delicate rendering of his beard and wrinkles, and the use of negative space create a calm, serene atmosphere that celebrates the sitter’s body rather than exoticizing it.

An Indian Man remains a mysterious drawing in Seurat’s body of work. We may never know the true origins and background of the man in the drawing, but it is this very mystery that makes An Indian Man such a mesmerizing object. Come see it for yourself through August 24, 2014, in the Getty Center’s West Pavilion.

PICK IT UP!
PICK IT UP!
NO SERIOUSLY MY BRAIN FELL OUT OF MY MOUTH!
PICK IT UP![Originally posted at benchiladaland]

PICK IT UP!

PICK IT UP!

NO SERIOUSLY MY BRAIN FELL OUT OF MY MOUTH!

PICK IT UP!

[Originally posted at benchiladaland]